Auld Lang Syne

We'll take a cup o' kindness yet

Set to a traditional folk song tune, the original song was written by Robert Burns in 1788, for which he drew on previously existing lines and sentiment.

 

The phrase 'for auld lang syne' loosely translates from old English to: "for (the sake of) old times." The song "calls for the preservation of our oldest, dearest friendships; perhaps observed in the reflective quality of New Year's Eve itself. A time when people come together to recall past joys and sorrows, specifically those spent in each other's company." The Independent

 

The song became popular to sing on Hogmanay or New Year's Eve in Scotland. The custom spread quickly to the British Isles and then to the rest of the world by immigrating British, Irish, Welsh and Scots people.

Robert Burns' portrait by 
Alexander Nasmyth

Burns' original Scots verse

 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
and auld lang syne?

 

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my jo,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll tak' a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stoup!
and surely I’ll be mine!
And we’ll tak' a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

We twa hae run about the braes,
and pou’d the gowans fine;
But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,
sin' auld lang syne. 

CHORUS

 

We twa hae paidl’d in the burn,
frae morning sun till dine;
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
sin' auld lang syne.

CHORUS

 

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!
and gie's a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll tak' a right gude-willie waught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

English translation (adapted)

 

Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old lang syne?

 

CHORUS:

For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we'll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

 

And surely you'll buy your pint cup!
And surely I'll buy mine!
And we'll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

 

We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine;
But we've wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

 

We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS

 

And there's a hand my trusty friend!
And give me a hand of thine!
And we'll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

Portrait image is in the public domain. The lyrics were taken from Wikipedia

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